There are two kinds of Bills Money Bills and Ordinary Bills. A Money Bill can be introduced the only in the Lok Sabha on the other hand Ordinary bill can be introduced in either Lok Sabha or Rajya Sabha.

Kinds of Bills - 


There are two kinds of bills which are as follows

1)  Money Bill

2)  Ordinary Bill


1) Money Bill - 


      Article 110 of the Indian Constitution defines “Money Bills” It says that a Bill shall be deemed to be a Money Bill if it contains only provisions dealing with all or any of the following matters, namely -
          (a) the imposition, abolition, remission, alteration or regulation of any tax;

           (b) the regulation of the borrowing of money or the giving of any guarantee by the Government of India, or the amendment of the law with respect to any financial obligations undertaken or to be undertaken by the Government of India;

          (c) the custody of the Consolidated Fund or the Contingency Fund of India, the payment of money into or the withdrawal of money from any such Fund;

         (d) the appropriation of money out of the Consolidated Fund of India;

         (e) the declaring of any expenditure to be expenditure charged on the Consolidated Fund of India or the increasing of the amount of any such expenditure;

         (f) the receipt of money on account of the Consolidated Fund of India or the public account of India or the custody or issue of such money or the audit of the accounts of the Union or of a State; or

         (g) any matter incidental to any of the matters specified in sub-clauses (a) to (f).

         A Bill shall not be deemed to be a Money Bill by reason only that it provides for the imposition of fines or other pecuniary penalties, or for the demand or payment of fees for licences or fees for services rendered, or by reason that it provides for the imposition, abolition, remission, alteration or regulation of any tax by any local authority or body for local purposes.
        If any question arises whether a Bill is a Money Bill or not, the decision of the Speaker of the House of the People thereon shall be final. There shall be endorsed on every Money Bill when it is transmitted to the Council of States under article 109, and when it is presented to the President for assent under article 111, the certificate of the Speaker of the House of the People signed by him that it is a Money Bill. All money bills are financial bills but all financial bills are not money bills

       A Money Bill can be introduced only in the Lok Sabha. It can be introduced only by a Minister. A Money Bill can be introduced only on Recommendation of the President. A Money Bill cannot be modified or rejected by the Rajya Sabha.The president cannot return it for reconsideration. Its defeat in the Lok Sabha leads to a resignation of the government. The Rajya Sabha can detain it for 14 days at the maximum.


See also... Financial Bills - Kinds of Financial Bills

2) Ordinary bill-  


          An ordinary bill for example bill other than money bill and financial bill.  ordinary bill can be introduced in either Lok Sabha or Rajya Sabha. It can be introduced by a Minister of a private member. It does not need Introduction by the President. If it is introduced by a Minister, it may lead to the resignation of the government. Ordinary Bill can be modified or rejected by Rajya Sabha. Rajya Sabha can detain it for 14 days at the maximum. The bill must be passed by both the houses of Parliament and then only it can be sent for President's assent.It becomes a law when it is assented to by the president.


Procedure -


      Each House has laid down a procedure for the passage of a Bill. According to the procedure of a House, a Bill has to pass through three stages commonly known as reading.

I) First reading

II) Second reading and

III) Third reading


I) First reading-

          At first Stage, the Bill is introduced in the house. At this Stage no discussion takes place

II) Second reading-

           The second is the consideration Stage when the bill is discussed clause by clause. At this stage, amendments may be moved.

III) Third reading-

           At the third reading stage, a brief general discussion of the bill takes place and the Bill is finally passed.


           When the bill is passed by one House it is sent to the other House, where a similar procedure is repeated.  If there is any disagreement between the house over any Bill, a Bill cannot be deemed to have been passed. if the two houses did not agree a deadlock is created. To resolve such deadlock the Constitution provides the method of the joint sitting of the Houses. This Provision does not apply to the money bill. The Money bill can become love without the concurrence of the Rajya Sabha,  therefore no question have arises for summoning in the joint sitting of the two houses for removing a deadlock.

See also... 

 Difference Between Money Bill and Ordinary Bill

42nd Amendment and The Preamble

Can Preamble be amended under Article 368 ??

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